Seringapatnam

Pagodas at Maugry with a distant view of Sewandroog

Sewandoorg (Savandurga) is a prominent hill in Karnataka. It was fortified in 1543 by an officer of the Vijayanagara kings. It was then acquired by the chief of Bangalore in 1570, with whom it remained until it was taken by Mysore in 1728. During Lord Cornwallis’ exploits in 1791, it was captured by the British.… Read more »

East view of Seringapatam

The walled city of Seringapatam or Srirangapatnam as it is renowned today was the capital of Mysore, under the Muslim rulers Haidar Ali (c.1722 – 1782) and his eldest son, Tipu Sultan (1753 -1799). The fortress was built near the Kaveri river and named after the ancient Hindu temple of Sri Ranganatha Swami, located at… Read more »

Premier Tableau: Taking of the Fort and City of Seringapatam, 4th may 1799

This Engraving by French illustrator and engraver Jean Duplessis-Bertaux is the Premier Tableau that depicts the siege of Seringapatam on the 4th of May, 1799. Jean Duplessis-Bertaux’s famous works include many representations of scenes of the French Revolution. Tipu Sultan’s formidable fortress at Seringapatam was breached after a month of relentless attacks by the British… Read more »

Darya Daulat Bagh, Tipu’s Summer Palace

This is one of the interiors of Tipu Sultan’s summer palace situated in Seringapatnam called Dariya Daulat Bagh. The image shows a pillared collonade, and a double storied interior – a arched walkway surmounted by a balconied upper floor.

Music Gallery of The Mosque, Seringapatam

This engraving is after a painting by James Hunter, from his collection of illustrations titled “Picturesque Scenery in the Kingdom of Mysore”. James Hunter worked for the Royal British Artillery in India and took part in the campaigns against Tipu Sultan. After the signing of the Treaty of Seringapatnam (Srirangapathnam), Hunter took permission from Tipu… Read more »